Data Facts Blog


From Data Facts: 5 Things Not to do After You Apply for a Mortgage

Buying a home can be one of the most stressful adventures a person can embark upon. From choosing the home, negotiating the price, obtaining a mortgage loan, to securing ownership, there are many pitfalls that can derail the plan.

Consumers often mistakenly believe that it is clean sailing after the mortgage loan process has been started. If the credit score it good, they are good to go, right. Wrong.

There are negative actions that can be taken even after the mortgage loan has been applied for that can decrease or annihilate the chances of getting that loan closed.

Today we are going to discuss the 5 No-No’s. These are the actions that a consumer needs to AVOID after applying for a mortgage loan.

#1: Don’t charge new credit card debt. In many cases, the mortgage loan was narrowly secured based on the consumer’s debt ratio or credit score. In these instances, even a few hundred dollars in new debt can cause the ratios to swing out of favor or credit scores to drop.  Postpone any new purchases on credit. Opt instead to pay cash.

#2:  Don’t quit your job.  The mortgage loan will be figured on your (and maybe your spouse’s) income. Your employment status will be checked again before the loan closes, and if the bank finds out you are unemployed, the mortgage loan will most likely fall through. Quitting your job is one of the most surefire ways to spoil the mortgage loan process.

#3:  Don’t buy a car.  If you get car fever during your mortgage process, REFRAIN from acting on it. A car loan will show up as a new inquiry on your credit report, AND the debt could possibly skew your debt ratios enough to mess up your chances of closing on your mortgage. Trust me, a car is not worth losing your dream home.

#4: Don’t miss payments. Forgetting to pay a bill or paying it late has a tremendously negative impact on a credit score. Just one late payment could tank your credit score to the point that the new mortgage would be unattainable. Practice diligence in paying your bills on time, especially when trying to obtain a mortgage.

#5: Don’t pay off old collections. It is a common misconception that “cleaning up” your credit by paying off old collection will help you look better to creditors. This is often not the case. By paying off an old collection, the date of last activity (which is how the credit scoring model looks at collections) will be brought to the present. The old collection will look like it just happened, which could result in a credit score drop of 100 points or more!  Leave old collections alone, and only pay them at closing, if required.

Securing a mortgage is a big endeavor. It takes lots of time and energy. Be sure to avoid these 5 common pitfalls to ensure you get the mortgage you want!

~~Susan McCullah is the Product Development Director for Data Facts, a 23 year old Memphis-based company.  Data Facts provides mortgage product and banking solutions to lenders nationwide. Check our our website for a complete explanation of our services.

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The Truth About Closing Credit Cards

If you have read anything about how to get and keep a high credit score, you have probably seen this advice: never close your credit cards. This advice is true and good. Sort of.

The 2 parts of valid reasoning behind the idea of not closing any credit cards are:

1: Closing a credit card will decrease your debt utilization ratio. A whopping 30% of your credit score is calculated from your Amounts Owed. Your debt utilization ratio (your total revolving debt divided by your total credit limit) needs to be as low as possible in order to reap the maximum credit score. Closing a credit card takes away some of your total credit limit, which can raise this ratio, and lower your credit score.

2. Closing a credit card will impact your length of credit history. It’s a fact that the credit scoring model looks at how long a person has had credit established; the longer, the better. Closing a credit card you have had for many years may cause your length of credit history to decrease, which can result in a lower score.

So, there are valid reasons to not close your credit cards.

ADVICE: Never close a card that has a balance, your only credit card, or your oldest credit card!

But what if you have a ton of cards, are aiming to streamline your finances, and want to close some of them? Which ones can you close that will have minimal impact to your credit score?

If you have made the decision to close some of your credit cards, choose these (in this order):

Your newest card. The last credit card opened needs to be the first one to go. This card is not helping you very much with your length of credit history, so closing it should not have much impact on your credit score.

Your card with a zero balance. If you never use a particular piece of plastic, it is probably not figured into your credit score (credit lines must be used at least every 6 months in order to be factored into your credit score). Closing a card you never, ever use should have no impact on your credit score.

Your card with the worst terms. Big annual fees, high interest rates, and no perks give you no incentive to keep a card active.

You card with the lowest limit. A low limit credit card is probably having little effect on your debt utilization ratio. Closing low limit plastic can help limit your number of cards without great danger of credit score damage.

Closing credit cards doesn’t have to kill your credit score, just make sure you are choosing wisely.

Other points to remember are:

Always look at your debt utilization ratio before closing a credit card. If your ratio is going to be over 30%, don’t do it.

Always keep at least one credit card open and active, and pay the bill on time. This will give you points for managing credit wisely.

Always keep your oldest credit card open and active.

Take these tips to heart to ensure that whittling down your lines of credit has minimal impact on your credit score.

~~Susan McCullah is the Product Development Director for Data Facts, a 22 year old Memphis-based company that provides mortgage product and banking solutions to lenders nationwide